Only 54 people live in Otira.

It’s difficult to know where to start after having a big break from blogging. Having said that, the ideas have not been thin on the ground- they’ve been constantly following me around on my travels. So I’ve got quite a lot to write about. It’s only now I’ve found time to sit down re-think these ideas and get them out of my head.

It was kind of strange for me, because my practice has always had a very key Englishness about it. It’s focus being- British homes, British objects and more recently- our social class system. That’s always been what I’ve been surrounded by I suppose. So how did being on the other side of the world affect my thinking? I think for some they may have felt swayed to delve into these new cultures; Australia, New Zealand and especially Bali’s unique way of life but for me I only saw it as a comparison to our British homes and lifestyle.

The main idea I’ve come away with is one that I touched on in Townsville, when we visited the remote village of Paluma, and that’s this: In truth it’s only our corner of the world that really matters to any individual.

Our sanctuary, our world, the world we know and care about, our family and friends, the place we find shelter and the place we know inside out. It’s the place we call home. Whether that’s in the secluded township of Otira (in the Southern Alps of NZ), or busy Ubud, or Watersedge Motel on The Strand or even in a caravan in Ullswater (the place I call my home)- It’s our corner of the world.

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